Weather and landscapes… what is the best time?

landscape, winter, fog, foggy, snow, Alberta, Dan Jurak, trees, prairie, dreamy,

My apologies for not posting here on WordPress more often but after so many years of blogging it sometimes like I am repeating myself and nobody but nobody likes to hear the same thing over and over again.

Winter has finally come to central Alberta and looks to stay again until the middle of April.

A question was raised the other day on Instagram where I now post about when is the best time to go out. Evening? Morning? Daytime?

The answer simply is, it depends.

Unless I am going out for a specific reason that is, a big storm is on radar during the summer months that I want to chase or if I happen to be doing infrared photos or long exposure photos… I get out in the middle of the day.

The storms usually happen in the later afternoon when with convection the clouds build up and then usually fizzle once it gets cooler in the evening.

With infrared photography which for me is a summer only pursuit the middle of the day when theres plenty of radiant energy in the foliage is the best time.

For long exposure images I want some blue sky and some clouds. For whatever reason it seems that we get these great popcorn shaped clouds around 11:00 a.m. on summer mornings. Too early, no clouds. Too late and the popcorn clouds have filled up the sky. When that happens a seven minute exposure leaves not tones in the sky. The sky becomes a blank white area.

Now to the original question from Instagram. If I am doing landscape in colour and am at home I only go out when conditions are right for me. From trial and error and many, many kilometres of driving I have learned how to best get the results that I want.

The first requirement for me is that the sun needs to be near the horizon. That means the morning or evening and they are usually both very different.

Here on the prairies we can get some blazing sunsets especially after storms so the evening can be good. In the winter sunsets are not usually as dramatic. Evening is my second choice.

My absolute first choice for any season is MORNING and the reason for that is FOG.

On the prairie things can look really blah. A large expanse of nothingness.

Fog has the ability to magically transform a boring place into something very special. If there is no fog forecast I prefer to walk my dog early in the morning because past experience has shown me that it is rare that I get images that I am happy with on fog free mornings.

Being in Alberta the climate is usually very dry so fog doesn’t happen often but on a good morning I can usually get twenty or thirty unique and very different kinds of photos that make up for the lack of good weather.

I have become a bit of a weather nut in my search for fog. The first place I will look is our  government forecaster for a forecast. If it looks slightly promising I go to a website called Cleardarksky.com It is my most valuable weather resource for photography for a few reasons. It gives me a great indicator of the chance of fog.

weather

When you visit it for your area it will show the predicted forecast for your general area no matter where you live. I look for a few things on there.

The first thing to look for of course is when the sun is rising. The chart is broken down into bars that cover the 24 hour clock in one hour increments. So you can look at 6:00 a.m. and see what it is predicted to look like for your area at that time.

The second is cloud cover. If the skies are one hundred percent filled with clouds I am probably not going out. Probably but that is more of a general rule than an absolute one. Winter mornings with completely overcast skies, frost and fog can produce some interesting results.

In order to get fog where I live one hundred percent humidity is needed. The chart shows that by the hour and in order to keep the fog from blowing away and disappearing NO WIND.

If I see that the humidity and wind are where I want them I am almost guaranteed pictures no matter where I go. They seem to be everywhere on those morning.

Of course when I visit places that I am visiting like Jasper or Banff, I go out regardless and hope for the best. I don’t have the luxury there of going out only when the conditions are great.

As with most things there are exceptions. About fifteen years ago during the Christmas holidays we were blessed with TWO day of thick fog, hoar frost and no wind. This made for long days because even the sunsets were foggy and dreamy and with the sun being so low to the horizon this far north at Christmas it was almost like early morning all day long. Like I said that was years ago and I have only seen that once but I hope to see it again one day.

So there you have it. My so called “secret” to getting good weather photos.

Happy shooting,

Dan

 

 

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~ by Dan Jurak on November 10, 2018.

4 Responses to “Weather and landscapes… what is the best time?”

  1. Hey Dan… i don’t often post comments on your blog, but i always read and enjoy them. over the years, i’ve learned a lot from you, so THANKS!

  2. Thanks Steve. I don’t post as often as I used to because I don’t want to sound like a broken record. Someone on Instagram asked me about when to take photos and it was easier to give a long answer on here than on there.

    Thank you for following all these years,
    Dan

  3. Thanks, Dan for post that is chock full of information. A definite keeper. And about the weather…it is truly Alberta.

  4. Thank you Jane. Warm weather this week. 🙂

    Dan

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